Riding Around In A Camera

Posted by on Mar 28 2013 | Behind The Scenes, Photography

via guest contributor, Megan Charland

Liminal Camera in ROC

I recently checked out the exhibition Silver and Water here at George Eastman House. Wow! Have you been in to see it yet? The moment I stepped into the gallery and saw the print on the floor submerged in water I was already planning my next visit. It’s wild to think that when I return next month I will be looking at an entirely different image as the print degrades.

silver and water

Once I tore myself away from the image on the floor I walked around the gallery admiring the gelatin silver prints on the wall. It was surprising to me, to see these photos framed and lit so perfectly. You see, I have seen prints like these before — I helped make one.

Liminal Camera in ROC

A couple of years ago Metabolic Studio drove the Liminal Camera to Visual Studies Workshop (VSW) and offered their MFA students, myself included, the opportunity to ride around in the camera and make a photograph.

I remember the moment I spun around in the light-tight darkroom door and entered the back of the camera (a shipping container) I instantly smelled the fixer and flashbacked to high school photography. The walls within the camera were lined with the tools of the trade. Light safe headlights, plastic tongs, timers, rubber gloves… it was all there.

Liminal Camera in ROC

Liminal Camera in ROC

Metabolic Studio picked us up from VSW and we drove to the former First National Bank of Rochester. [WATCH] The ride to the bank was personally my favorite part. It was such a surreal experience to watch the world in front of me pass me by upside down. I also lost all sense of time inside the camera. It was funny, the Liminal Camera had to make a few maneuvering attempts to exit the VSW parking lot. The entire time they were backing up and turning around, I could have sworn we must have driven miles already, but really we hadn’t even left the parking lot yet!

Liminal Camera in ROC

Once we parked at our destination we then prepped to take a photograph. As a class, we worked together to first make a test-strip, then a negative, and then the final print. The final print is now part of the permanent collections at VSW.

If you haven’t been in to see Silver and Water yet I highly recommend it. If you’ve already been, go back and let me know how that print in the water is doing!

Liminal Camera and VSW

Liminal Camera and VSW

 

-Megan Charland
@megancharland
artist, blogger, curator

Megan Charland

 

Comments Off for now

This… is the Memory Card

Posted by on Jan 22 2013 | Technology

Check out this short clip from the local news with Todd Gustavson our technology curator taking a look at the inside of the Tactical Camera. One of only two models ever made, this camera is what all digital cameras were derived from.

Big box of a memory card shown above

More on our new historic acquisition here.

2 comments for now

Happy Holidays From Eastman House

Posted by on Dec 24 2012 | Photography

Have a very merry holiday from our house to yours.

McCall Homemaking Cover, Xmas Tree

 

Accession Number: 1971:0048:0038
Maker: Nickolas Muray (American 1892-1965)
Title: ”MCCALL HOMEMAKING COVER, XMAS TREE”
Date: 1944
Medium: ”color print, assembly (Carbro) process”
Dimensions: Dimensions Unknown
George Eastman House Collection

 

 

Comments Off for now

Historic New Acquisition at Eastman House

Posted by on Dec 19 2012 | Technology


An excerpt from our Films & Events publication

The object above is the Eastman Kodak Company Tactical Camera. Designed in 1989, this was donated to us by Exelis Inc. in Rochester, NY.

This piece is most notable for being the earliest extant digital single-lens reflex camera. Eastman Kodak produced its first megapixel imaging sensor in the mid–1980s.

James McGarvey, a company engineer, designed and built the imaging firmware and storage system for the M1 sensor, which was installed in a Canon F1 film camera, making it the world’s first digital single-lens reflex camera. Known as the Electro-Optic (E-O) Camera, it was built for the U.S. government in 1988 for covert use. The Tactical Camera evolved from the E-O project the next year and was a more robust system used to demonstrate the company’s digital technology to potential industrial customers.

Kodak M1 Sensor

Our Technology Curator Todd Gustavson on the acquisition, “The Tactical Camera may well be the most important object acquired during my 24 years at Eastman House. There is nothing like it in the collection. Not only is it is the oldest digital camera in the collection, but more importantly, it is one of only two ever made, and it is from these models that all digital cameras were derived.”

For more information, visit McGarvey’s website.

 

Comments Off for now

Ernesto Bazan on Cuba

Posted by on Dec 18 2012 | Other

During our visiting artist lecture series Wish You Were Here, Ernesto Bazan shared with us his professional and personal life changing experiences while in Cuba – and his new book “Al Campo“.

 

 

 

Comments Off for now

« Prev - Next »