Dryden Theatre Renovation Series: The Curtain Stays

Posted by on Dec 21 2012 | Motion Pictures


Kolbe inspects the curtain

In this series, Theatre Manager, Kolbe Resnick will keep us up to date on the renovation each week with everything related to the Dryden Theatre makeover from the seats to the projection booth.

 
If there is one question I have been asked more than any other in the past few months it is “Will the curtain stay after the theater is reopened?”. The answer to that question is a resounding “Yes.” Our unique gold curtain will absolutely be there on March 2nd. Nothing could ever possibly replace the excitement evoked from the raising of the curtain and the slow fade out of the music. It is a truly unique experience. An experience you only get at the Dryden. Taking the curtain down, storing it, and reinstalling it is no small task, however. Curtain specialists at Reynold’s Drapery in Newport will be coming in the morning of January 2 to safely remove it from the theater and bring it to an off-site storage location before the major part of the restoration begins.

Another question I’ve been asked repeatedly is: “Two months? That seems like a long time!” Actually, two months is the perfect amount of time. January will be the month for the cosmetic renovations, which includes the new seats, carpeting, paint, and lighting. February will be when the renovations of the projection booth take place, including our exciting new addition: the digital projector. As we want everything to be perfect for our reopening, we aren’t willing to take
any chances on time.

If you’ve come to the Dryden in the past week you may or may not have noticed the first steps of the renovation process. During the day electricians have been hard at work in the theater preparing for the full on restoration. Beginning with familiarizing themselves with the theater they’ve been locating circuits, rerouting cables that run through the theater, and preparing the aisle lighting that will run along the edge of the seats. You may have noticed the slow clearing
out of the box office. By January 1st, the box office will be empty. And when you come on January 1st for our final screening (Cinema Paradiso) in the old Dryden you will notice that the lobby furniture and the piano will be gone. Following that screening everything will be plasticated in the booth, in the offices, and in the closets surrounding the theater. The following morning the seats will be taken out and loaded into a truck to be distributed to those of you who reserved them.

The historic Heywood-Wakefield seats we are removing sold out in a matter of days, but you can still get on the waiting list here.  City Newspaper ran an excellent story about the theater in last week and today we had two news crews in here.

There is roughly one more week of screenings in the old Dryden! The last chance to see the theater the way it is there are a wide variety of films playing that appeal to everyone.

Come celebrate the moving image!

More on the Dryden Theatre Renovation:
Part II, Seatless
Part III, Cement, Lighting, and Accessibility
Part IV, Painting, Listening System and Digital Projection
Part V, Stage and Carpet

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Ernesto Bazan on Cuba

Posted by on Dec 18 2012 | Other

During our visiting artist lecture series Wish You Were Here, Ernesto Bazan shared with us his professional and personal life changing experiences while in Cuba – and his new book “Al Campo“.

 

 

 

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Cinema is an Event

Posted by on Dec 07 2012 | Motion Pictures

We are excited to announce the Dryden Theatre renovation! We’ll be talking lots more and giving updates in the coming days…

 

 

 

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Spirited Away at the Dryden

Posted by on Nov 20 2012 | Motion Pictures

Hayao Miyazaki’s Academy Award-winning masterpiece Spirited Away was Japan’s biggest-ever box office hit and a film that helped redefine the possibilities of animation for American audiences and a generation of new filmmakers.

Wandering through an abandoned carnival site, 10-year-old Chichiro is separated from her parents and stumbles into a dream-like spirit world where she is put to work in a bathhouse for the gods, a place where all kinds of nonhuman beings come to refresh, relax and recharge. Here she must find the inner strength to outsmart her captors and return to her family. Combining Japanese mythology with Through the Looking Glass whimsy, Spirited Away cemented Miyazaki’s reputation as an icon of inspired animation and wondrous, lyrical storytelling.

From our Hayao Miyazaki film series

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Hayao Miyazaki Film Series

Posted by on Nov 02 2012 | Motion Pictures

 

Miyazaki’s Spirited Away, perhaps the best known of the studio’s features in the United States, won the Academy Award® for Best Animated Feature in 2002. In 2005 Miyazaki was named one of Time Magazine’s “100 Most Influential People.”
 

 
Studio Ghibli, founded in Tokyo in 1985 by animation directors Hayao Miyazaki and Isao Takahata, is one of the most successful and well-respected animation studios in the world. Cultivating a creative force of talented directors, animators, and storytellers under the revered brilliance of Miyazaki and Takahata, Studio Ghibli’s films have been praised for their originality, dazzling animation, and epic storytelling. The films have become a beloved part of Japanese popular culture and have garnered worldwide acclaim from audiences and critics alike.
 
All films dubbed in English.
 
Friday, Nov. 2, 8 p.m.
Sunday, Nov. 4, 2 p.m.
Castle in the Sky
(Tenkû no shiro Rapyuta, Hayao Miyazaki, Japan 1986, 124 min. )

Friday, Nov. 9, 8 p.m.
Sunday, Nov. 11, 2 p.m.
Nausicaä of the Valley of the Wind
(Kaze no Tani no Naushika, Hayao Miyazaki, Japan 1984, 116 min.)

Friday, Nov. 16, 8 p.m.
My Neighbor Totoro
(Tonari no Totoro, Hayao Miyazaki, Japan 1988, 86 min.)

Friday, Nov. 23, 8 p.m.
Sunday, Nov. 25, 2 p.m.
Spirited Away
(Sen to Chihiro no kamikakushi, Hayao Miyazaki, Japan 2002, 125 min.)

Sunday, Nov. 30, 8 p.m. 
Sunday, Dec 2, 2 p.m. 
Princess Mononoke
(Mononoke-hime, Hayao Miyazaki, Japan 1997, 134 min.)

 

 

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