A Different Type of Daguerreotype

Posted by on Aug 01 2012 | Exhibitions, Other, Photography

We recently acquired a shell covered Lighthouse. Yes, a shell covered lighthouse. This delicate construction is of particular interest to us because it contains a daguerreotype inset at the bottom of the tower. The daguerreotype displays three women and a young girl – we believe the image to be circa 1850, while the lighthouse was likely built in the 1920′s.

Alison Nordström our senior curator of photographs explains,

“we welcome the opportunity to exhibit a piece with such visual appeal. The Lighthouse is an example of how we can provide an accessible point of entry for a more serious consideration of our daguerreotype holdings. It also adds value to our collection of similar objects, such as the Ansel Adams coffee tin and the deer leg lamp with photographic lampshade.”

This interesting and admittedly, different piece was carefully examined and cleaned and can be seen currently in the Ideas in Things exhibit.


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Photographic Process 1.0: The Daguerreotype

Posted by on Jun 05 2012 | Other, Photography

This month we’re highlighting a series of videos on six photographic processes featured throughout our current exhibition, See: Untold Stories.
We’re taking a look at the invention of the process and talking with our curators and historians, who help us put these processes into historical and cultural contexts.

First up, The Daguerrotype.

The discovery of this process forever changed our understanding of time. For the first time in history we could see what our ancestors looked like. Take a look behind the scenes into our world class photograph collection from within our vaults. We currently house more than 3,500 Daguerreotypes, including 1,500 French Daguerrotypes – the largest collection outside France.

Up next, The Collodion Process, The Albumen Print, The Woodburytype, The Platinum Print, and The Gelatin Silver Print.

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