Archive for the 'Technology' Category

Who’s Talking Gender?

Posted by on Jul 17 2013 | Other, Photography, Technology

Nickolas Muray (American, b. Hungary, 1892-1965) Douglas Fairbanks, Jr. & Joan Crawford ca. 1930 Gelatin silver print Gift of Mrs. Nickolas Muray

Nickolas Muray (American, b. Hungary, 1892-1965) Douglas Fairbanks, Jr. & Joan Crawford ca. 1930 Gelatin silver print Gift of Mrs. Nickolas Muray

The Gender Show is open now (through October) – an exhibition that urges dialogue, discourse, and contemplation. While we’re letting the photographs in the exhibit do most of the talking, we also want to see who else is exploring and challenging gender. We’ll be keeping track of some headlines and interesting topics here so keep checking back! Please leave a comment for any suggestions.

[7.17]Meet the world’s third gender

[7.11]If you were born a woman, how would you be different? Teary eyed Dustin Hoffman’s response and regret
[6.28]Paychex adding written policy against gender-identity bias after prodding by state comptroller
[6.24]White womens bodies as selfie objectified tools of dissent via Hyperallergic
[6.17] Elite Units in U.S. Military to Admit Women via NY Times
[6.17] Deciphering the genetic code of the cancer via BBC
[6.17] A “dismal week” for Australian feminists: Many men find gender debates too threatening to handle
[6.16] How 8 Gay Families Are Celebrating Father’s Day This Year via Huff Post
[
6.12] Why Dad’s Don’t Take Paternity Leave  via WSJ
[6.12] Manly Manicures  via NY Times
[6.11] Why Siri’s Voice Is Now A Man (And A Woman) via Huff Post

 

More images from the show available here.

Comments Off for now

Mystery nitrate negatives – we need your help!

Posted by on Jul 02 2013 | Behind The Scenes, Exploring the Archive, House & Gardens, Technology

via guest contributor and Eastman House volunteer, Kate Wallace

GEH_44293

While cleaning out the nitrate holding room at the museum, boxes of safety film and nitrate negatives were discovered that appear to have been donated to the museum in the late 1940’s when the museum was getting ready to open to the public.

GEH_44292

The boxes contain negatives that document various aspects of Kodak’s progress and activities from the late 1930s through the 1940s. Interesting handwritten notes describe many of the pictures that range from details such as a “small crack in the wall of a basement” to “condition of a safety boot.”

GEH_44291

There are portraits of employees who won awards for their initiatives to improve the company, along with parts of machines or tools from all different branches such as optics, film processing, and even some war time preparation and production.

GEH_44290

Not every negative matches up with a note, however, and many of the images are unidentifiable without knowledge of the film and processes used during this period. Any help in determining what some of these photographs are depicting, or what the machines pictured may have been used for would allow us to continue this documentation that began so many years ago.

GEH_44294

We are posting these five images in this post to start. If you can help send us a message, or leave a comment below. Thanks!

1 comment for now

Google is in the house

Posted by on Jun 17 2013 | Exploring the Archive, House & Gardens, Motion Pictures, Photography, Technology

This month Google adds more than 1,000 new destinations to experience via street view. It looks like we are one of the first destinations locally (Rochester, N.Y.) to open our doors beyond the street.

the technology vault

This is exciting to us for a few reasons – the first, visitors onsite will now have the opportunity to use their mobile’s to know where they are throughout the house and museum. Secondly, for those that may never come to Eastman House it is an opportunity to invite all to come on in and learn a little bit more about us.
Lastly, we realize as an institution another important aspect for Eastman House is what is going on behind the scenes – our schools (Photographic Preservation and Collections Management & The L. Jeffrey Selznick School of Film Preservation) and students working in the collections, our conservation labs and photo processes and finally, the vaults. We are pleased to reveal our technology vault three floors underground (are we the first museum to do so?)

So feel free to take a drive and look around – make sure to check out the gardens too!

Having also partnered with Google’s Art Project (the cultural institute), we became the first photography museum to open its collections to the world. More information here, here and here.

Eastman House holds nearly 500,000 photographs representing every major process and the work of more than 14,000 photographers. In addition to the photographs, the collection holds important examples of the photograph’s role in our culture over time – including photojournalism, advertising, etc.  The Motion Picture Collection is one of the major moving image archives in the U.S.

Screen shot 2013-06-17 at 11.19.24 AM

Eastman House is – and always has been – an independent nonprofit institution. We rely on the support of donors, locally and internationally so we can continue to tell the story of photography and motion pictures.

Our new director Bruce Barnes relays our situation honestly, “Frankly, it is a challenge to fund a non-profit institution of our scope in a metropolitan area of one million. George Eastman House has always been an independent, non-profit institution, but the prevailing economic environment has made fundraising more difficult – creating a shortfall at a critical time“.

Thanks for your consideration and above all else take a look!

Comments Off for now

April 15, 1840 – One of the first cameras sold in the U.S.

Posted by on Apr 15 2013 | Photography, Technology

BemisReceipt

Receipt of one of the first cameras to be sold in the U.S.

Samuel A. Bemis (1793–1881), a Boston dentist and amateur daguerreotypist, bought one of the first cameras ever sold in the United States on April 15, 1840. Fortunately, he and his heirs saved not only the camera but also its receipt. While it is likely too late to return the camera, the receipt is useful as evidence of what is probably the earliest documented sale of an American daguerrean outfit.

Thanks to the dentist’s pack rat ways, we know that on April 15, 1840, he paid $76 to François Gouraud, Giroux’s agent in the U.S., for a “daguerreotype apparatus,” twelve whole plates at $2 each, and a freight charge of $1.

197817920001

Full-plate daguerreotype camera (owned by S. A. Bemis)

The apparatus, which Gouraud advertised as consisting of sixty-two items, included the camera, lens, plate holder, iodine box for sensitizing plates, mercury box for developing plates, holding box for unused plates, and a large wooden trunk to house the entire system. Quite large, the camera weighs about thirteen pounds and can produce full-plate images, 6½ x 8½ inches in size.

197817920001k

Full-plate daguerreotype camera outfit

Bemis made his first daguerreotype on April 19, 1840, from the window of his Boston office, and during the next several years went on to expose more than three hundred images, most of them in his beloved White Mountains of New Hampshire. The George Eastman House collection also contains a second Bemis camera and nineteen of his images.

First Bemis Daguerreotype

First  S.A. Bemis Daguerreotype

bemis 1936 inventory 1
Bemis’ Inventory in 1936 discussing the camera purchase in 1840.

 

 

1 comment for now

Eastman House and Google Art Project

Posted by on Apr 03 2013 | Exhibitions, Photography, Technology

update

Eastman House is now on the Google Art Project!

Screen shot 2013-04-03 at 9.59.05 AM

The initial group of 50 photographs on Google Art Project spans the 1840s through the late 20th century and a wide variety of photographic processes from the 174 years of the medium’s existence are represented. The variety of subjects featured include Frida Kahlo, Martin Luther King Jr., the first train wreck ever photographed, the Lincoln conspirators, the Egyptian pyramids and Sphinx in the 1850s, and a portrait of photo pioneer Daguerre.

The list of the masters include William Henry Fox Talbot, Hill & Adamson, Southworth & Hawes, Timothy O’Sullivan, Mathew Brady, Julia Margaret Cameron, Eadweard Muybridge, William Henry Jackson, Edward S. Curtis, Gertrude Kasebier, Eugene Atget, Alfred Stieglitz, Lewis W. Hine, Dorothea Lange, Nickolas Muray, and Benedict J. Fernandez. We will continually add works to the project throughout the year.

Our partnership with Google is an exciting endeavor and truly opens the door to the contents within our photography vault, with a reach unlike ever before. The online exhibition experience allows for high resolution and high level research with otherwise unseen objects.

UPDATE
More info here and here via mashable

We have also worked with Google to be a part of its Google Maps Street View project. Later this year, 360-degree views of the museum’s gardens, grounds, historic house, and vaults will be available.

 

If you haven’t yet had a chance to watch our latest video about the museum, here it is:

 

 

Comments Off for now

Next »