Archive for the 'Photography' Category

Happy Birthday, Gertrude Käsebier!

Posted by on May 20 2013 | Photography

complete article on our photography blog, DODGE & BURN. 

Gertrude Käsebier (American, 1852-1934) , Dancing School, ca. 1905, gum bichromate print, gifts of Hermime Turner

Gertrude Käsebier (American, 1852-1934) , Dancing School, ca. 1905, gum bichromate print, gifts of Hermime Turner


 

Gertrude Käsebier was born in 1852 in Des Moines, Iowa, daughter of John and Muncy Stanton. When she was still very young, Käsebier moved to Colorado where her father eventually became owner of a gold mine in Leadville. The trip across the plains by covered wagon and the frontier life near Indians sparked the imagination and adventuresome personality of Käsebier…[MORE]

 

 

 

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Erie Canal Excursion

Posted by on May 16 2013 | Photography

via guest contributor, Chris Holmquist
Photographic Process Research Apprentice

Exchange Club w Boat IIHR copy

The Philadelphia Photographic Exchange Club 19th century canal excursion, lantern slide from the Scully & Osterman archives

In a few weeks, George Eastman House Process Historian, Mark Osterman and team will lead a photography workshop unlike any other; a tintype excursion along the historic Erie Canal.

For three days we will float down the waterway in an authentic canal boat; navigating the step locks, staying overnight in a bed & breakfast and most importantly, stopping along the way to make authentic large-format tintypes on location, using a portable darkroom.

This excursion is modeled after similar trips that took place in the 1860’s by members of the Philadelphia Photograph Exchange Club. Groups like this consisted mostly of  ‘gentleman scholars’; men with the benefit of free time, the resources needed to pursue such an involved hobby and an aptitude to make legitimate contributions to an ever evolving science. Outings like a canal trip were an excellent opportunity for amateur photographers to share their techniques, enjoy the surroundings and generally celebrate the wonderful process of making images in a camera.

Exchange Club w Cameras HR copy

The Philadelphia Photographic Exchange Club

In that period it was “mule teams”on shore that pulled the canal boats along, and although we will be taking advantage of the internal combustion engine, it’s in the same spirit that we set out to explore the Erie Canal in the first week of June. It’s a rare treat to learn the wet collodion technique from one of the world’s leading authorities, while also getting a chance to forget the modern world for a few days and relive a piece of photography’s past.

UPDATE: The workshop sold out over the weekend, but if interested, please take a look at the rest of our workshops through 2013.

If this sounds like a fantastic opportunity, you’ll be pleased to hear that there’s one open spot remaining in our roster! 

 

 

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Turning the gallery into a darkroom

Posted by on Apr 26 2013 | Photography

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As part of Silver and Water, currently on view in the museum’s South and Brackett Clark galleries, an 8-foot by 12-foot negative of Kodak’s chemical factory was soaked in a shallow bath of water, the silver image slowly decaying.

soaked

8×12 negative

Silver and Water artists Lauren Bon and the Optics Division of the Metabolic Studio are returning to Eastman House to create a public darkroom performance with the negative. The South Gallery is in process of being converted into a darkened space, and, with audience participation, a giant contact print of the decayed image will be created.

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working on the transition this week

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Wednesday, May 8 at 6:00 p.m.
The event is included with museum admission, if you’re in town we hope to see you there!

 

 

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April 15, 1840 – One of the first cameras sold in the U.S.

Posted by on Apr 15 2013 | Photography, Technology

BemisReceipt

Receipt of one of the first cameras to be sold in the U.S.

Samuel A. Bemis (1793–1881), a Boston dentist and amateur daguerreotypist, bought one of the first cameras ever sold in the United States on April 15, 1840. Fortunately, he and his heirs saved not only the camera but also its receipt. While it is likely too late to return the camera, the receipt is useful as evidence of what is probably the earliest documented sale of an American daguerrean outfit.

Thanks to the dentist’s pack rat ways, we know that on April 15, 1840, he paid $76 to François Gouraud, Giroux’s agent in the U.S., for a “daguerreotype apparatus,” twelve whole plates at $2 each, and a freight charge of $1.

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Full-plate daguerreotype camera (owned by S. A. Bemis)

The apparatus, which Gouraud advertised as consisting of sixty-two items, included the camera, lens, plate holder, iodine box for sensitizing plates, mercury box for developing plates, holding box for unused plates, and a large wooden trunk to house the entire system. Quite large, the camera weighs about thirteen pounds and can produce full-plate images, 6½ x 8½ inches in size.

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Full-plate daguerreotype camera outfit

Bemis made his first daguerreotype on April 19, 1840, from the window of his Boston office, and during the next several years went on to expose more than three hundred images, most of them in his beloved White Mountains of New Hampshire. The George Eastman House collection also contains a second Bemis camera and nineteen of his images.

First Bemis Daguerreotype

First  S.A. Bemis Daguerreotype

bemis 1936 inventory 1
Bemis’ Inventory in 1936 discussing the camera purchase in 1840.

 

 

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Eastman House and Google Art Project

Posted by on Apr 03 2013 | Exhibitions, Photography, Technology

update

Eastman House is now on the Google Art Project!

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The initial group of 50 photographs on Google Art Project spans the 1840s through the late 20th century and a wide variety of photographic processes from the 174 years of the medium’s existence are represented. The variety of subjects featured include Frida Kahlo, Martin Luther King Jr., the first train wreck ever photographed, the Lincoln conspirators, the Egyptian pyramids and Sphinx in the 1850s, and a portrait of photo pioneer Daguerre.

The list of the masters include William Henry Fox Talbot, Hill & Adamson, Southworth & Hawes, Timothy O’Sullivan, Mathew Brady, Julia Margaret Cameron, Eadweard Muybridge, William Henry Jackson, Edward S. Curtis, Gertrude Kasebier, Eugene Atget, Alfred Stieglitz, Lewis W. Hine, Dorothea Lange, Nickolas Muray, and Benedict J. Fernandez. We will continually add works to the project throughout the year.

Our partnership with Google is an exciting endeavor and truly opens the door to the contents within our photography vault, with a reach unlike ever before. The online exhibition experience allows for high resolution and high level research with otherwise unseen objects.

UPDATE
More info here and here via mashable

We have also worked with Google to be a part of its Google Maps Street View project. Later this year, 360-degree views of the museum’s gardens, grounds, historic house, and vaults will be available.

 

If you haven’t yet had a chance to watch our latest video about the museum, here it is:

 

 

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