Archive for the 'Photography' Category

75 years – The Super Kodak Six-20

Posted by on Jul 17 2013 | Photography

SuperKodakSix-20

Super Kodak Six-20, 1938, Eastman Kodak Company, Rochester, New York. Gift of Eastman Kodak Company

July 2013 marks the 75th anniversary of the Super Kodak Six-20, the first production camera to feature automatic exposure (AE) control. Aimed at removing the exposure guesswork for photographers, the camera’s shutter-preferred AE control meant that the photographer chose the shutter speed and the camera would then “choose” the correct lens opening. Kodak’s engineers accomplished this feat by mechanically coupling a selenium photo cell light meter, located just above the top half of the camera’s folding clamshell.

This advancement, though groundbreaking, was not picked up by most camera manufacturers for some twenty years after the debut of the Super Six-20. These days, automatic exposure is a standard feature on almost all cameras. And it is not much of a stretch to call the Super Kodak Six-20 the first “smart camera.”

But auto exposure was not the only cutting-edge feature of the Super Six-20. It was also the first Kodak camera to use a common window for both the rangefinder and viewfinder. The film advances with a single-stroke lever, which also cocks the shutter at the end of the stroke, thus preventing double exposures. And like auto exposure, these features would not become common on cameras for many years.

SuperKodakSix-20.1

Features aside, the Super Kodak Six-20 is one of the most attractive cameras ever marketed. Its lovely clamshell exterior design was styled by legendary industrial designer Walter Dorwin Teague.

All this innovation came at a rather high price and not without some issues. The Super Kodak Six-20 retailed for $225 in 1938 (that would be over $2,000 today) and it had a reputation for being somewhat unreliable—the built-in self-timer was known to lock up the shutter. Since few models were manufactured, some 719, it is highly sought after by camera collectors.

 

 

 

 

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Who’s Talking Gender?

Posted by on Jul 17 2013 | Other, Photography, Technology

Nickolas Muray (American, b. Hungary, 1892-1965) Douglas Fairbanks, Jr. & Joan Crawford ca. 1930 Gelatin silver print Gift of Mrs. Nickolas Muray

Nickolas Muray (American, b. Hungary, 1892-1965) Douglas Fairbanks, Jr. & Joan Crawford ca. 1930 Gelatin silver print Gift of Mrs. Nickolas Muray

The Gender Show is open now (through October) – an exhibition that urges dialogue, discourse, and contemplation. While we’re letting the photographs in the exhibit do most of the talking, we also want to see who else is exploring and challenging gender. We’ll be keeping track of some headlines and interesting topics here so keep checking back! Please leave a comment for any suggestions.

[7.17]Meet the world’s third gender

[7.11]If you were born a woman, how would you be different? Teary eyed Dustin Hoffman’s response and regret
[6.28]Paychex adding written policy against gender-identity bias after prodding by state comptroller
[6.24]White womens bodies as selfie objectified tools of dissent via Hyperallergic
[6.17] Elite Units in U.S. Military to Admit Women via NY Times
[6.17] Deciphering the genetic code of the cancer via BBC
[6.17] A “dismal week” for Australian feminists: Many men find gender debates too threatening to handle
[6.16] How 8 Gay Families Are Celebrating Father’s Day This Year via Huff Post
[
6.12] Why Dad’s Don’t Take Paternity Leave  via WSJ
[6.12] Manly Manicures  via NY Times
[6.11] Why Siri’s Voice Is Now A Man (And A Woman) via Huff Post

 

More images from the show available here.

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How photographs have presented gender over time

Posted by on Jul 10 2013 | Exhibitions, Photography

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Lou Jones – Giving a voice to those that have none

Posted by on Jun 21 2013 | Photography

loujones

During our visiting artist lecture series Wish You Were Here, Lou Jones shared with us his experiences around the world…

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Google is in the house

Posted by on Jun 17 2013 | Exploring the Archive, House & Gardens, Motion Pictures, Photography, Technology

This month Google adds more than 1,000 new destinations to experience via street view. It looks like we are one of the first destinations locally (Rochester, N.Y.) to open our doors beyond the street.

the technology vault

This is exciting to us for a few reasons – the first, visitors onsite will now have the opportunity to use their mobile’s to know where they are throughout the house and museum. Secondly, for those that may never come to Eastman House it is an opportunity to invite all to come on in and learn a little bit more about us.
Lastly, we realize as an institution another important aspect for Eastman House is what is going on behind the scenes – our schools (Photographic Preservation and Collections Management & The L. Jeffrey Selznick School of Film Preservation) and students working in the collections, our conservation labs and photo processes and finally, the vaults. We are pleased to reveal our technology vault three floors underground (are we the first museum to do so?)

So feel free to take a drive and look around – make sure to check out the gardens too!

Having also partnered with Google’s Art Project (the cultural institute), we became the first photography museum to open its collections to the world. More information here, here and here.

Eastman House holds nearly 500,000 photographs representing every major process and the work of more than 14,000 photographers. In addition to the photographs, the collection holds important examples of the photograph’s role in our culture over time – including photojournalism, advertising, etc.  The Motion Picture Collection is one of the major moving image archives in the U.S.

Screen shot 2013-06-17 at 11.19.24 AM

Eastman House is – and always has been – an independent nonprofit institution. We rely on the support of donors, locally and internationally so we can continue to tell the story of photography and motion pictures.

Our new director Bruce Barnes relays our situation honestly, “Frankly, it is a challenge to fund a non-profit institution of our scope in a metropolitan area of one million. George Eastman House has always been an independent, non-profit institution, but the prevailing economic environment has made fundraising more difficult – creating a shortfall at a critical time“.

Thanks for your consideration and above all else take a look!

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