Archive for the 'Motion Pictures' Category

Évocateur Film Premiere // Dryden Trivia

Posted by on Jan 16 2014 | contest, Motion Pictures, Other

Win this poster!

Screen shot 2014-01-15 at 5.59.13 PM

Before shock jocks, Jerry Springer, and Fox News, one man ravaged the talk show format and delivered his own brand of confrontation and in-your-face antics. His name was Morton Downey Jr., and he turned political debate into shouting matches, occasional fistfights, and downright mayhem.

Featuring interviews with Herman Cain, Pat Buchanan, Chris Elliot, and Gloria Allred, the new documentary Évocateur: The Morton Downey Jr. Movie probes the methods and motivations of not only Downey’s controversial television persona, but the man he was when the cameras were turned off.



The Dryden Theatre will be host to the Rochester Premiere of Évocateur: The Morton Downey Jr. Movie on Saturday, January 18 at 8 p.m., and we’re thrilled to welcome the Director of the film, Seth Kramer, as our special guest for the evening.

How well do you know your Morton Downey Jr. trivia? For each correct answer your name will be entered to win a pair of tickets to the screening and one lucky person will win a signed poster! Winners announced Friday, January 17 at 4 p.m. ET.

1. Which of these guests did not appear on the Morton Downey Jr. Show? A. Timothy Leary B. Abbey Hoffman C. Meir Kahane D. Yasser Arafat.

2. What famous surf tune is Morton Downey Jr. incorrectly credited with writing?

3. What talk show guest guest was at the center violent outbreaks on both the Morton Downey Jr. Show and the Geraldo Rivera Show?

Leave your answers in the comment section.

 
 

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Too Much Johnson U.S. Premiere Preview

Posted by on Oct 16 2013 | Motion Pictures, Other

Last Wednesday, October 9, staged the long awaited world premiere of Too Much Johnson at Le Giornate del Cinema Muto Silent Film Festival in Pordenone, northern Italy. As a long time attendee of the festival, fan of the work of Orson Welles and the Mercury Theatre, and having had the honor to work at the preservation of Too Much Johnson, it was hard for me to stay away from Le Giornate this year. So I took the opportunity to travel to my native Italy and enjoy the event.

It is difficult to think about a better venue for the first screening of this long-believed- to-be-lost 1938 slapstick silent film. Not only is Pordenone  the city hosting the world’s leading international silent film festival, defined by its aficionados as “the best film festival in the world,” but it is the very same place where a nitrate print of Too Much Johnson was recently discovered and brought out of the shadows. The inventive pen of a novelist could have hardly created a happier – and more surprising – ending.

When lights went off on Wednesday evening in a packed Teatro Giuseppe Verdi, an international audience of film scholars, historians, archivists, and simply film lovers, joined for the occasion by a varied crowd of journalists and Welles enthusiasts, was finally able to enjoy the explosion of vitality brought on the screen by the whole group of the Mercury Theatre and in particular by the stunning performance of young and extremely promising Joseph Cotten.

TMJ-Pordenone-11

Images on screen were accompanied by an English live commentary by Paolo Cherchi Usai, Senior Curator of George Eastman House Motion Picture Department, introducing the audience to the world of Too Much Johnson. The commentary, integrating research conducted by the Motion Picture Department during the past few months, seems to pave the way for a new mode of presenting images that have reached us in a somewhat raw state, and consequently might need to be contextualized to be fully appreciated by an audience. And the audience of the festival was well aware of the privilege of being the first ever seeing Too Much Johnson, since the film was never completed by Orson Welles and shown in public before.

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No wonder that request for tickets was so high that the festival organizers had to add to the calendar two extra screenings with Italian live commentary provided by Paolo Cherchi Usai and myself. All three screenings of Too Much Johnson have been accompanied at the piano by Phil Carli, with music especially composed for the film.

Tonight’s U.S. Premiere at George Eastman House will bring again on stage a unique combination of images, music and expert commentary. Something to definitely be looking forward to.

 

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King of B-movies – Roger Corman

Posted by on Sep 12 2013 | Motion Pictures

Director’s note via Films & Events 9/10, 2013

The Intruder (1962)

The Intruder (1962)

The George Eastman Award for distinguished contribution to the art of film was established in 1955, and was the first award by an American film archive to honor artistic work of enduring value. In bestowing this honor, we recognize individuals who have enriched the field of motion pictures. Legendary recipients have ranged from George Cukor and Fred Astaire to Martin Scorsese and Meryl Steep.

This year’s award, being presented to Roger Corman on November 2, marks our belated embrace of independent cinema. Far surpassing his reputation as the undisputed king of B-movies, Corman has had an enormous impact on both independent and mainstream cinema over the past six decades. He is the paragon of the independents.

Best known for The Little Shop of Horrors (1960)—said to have been filmed in just two days—and his Edgar Allan Poe cycle starring Vincent Price, Corman has had a long career as a director of groundbreaking and entertaining films. He fearlessly approached every subject he covered, from monster movies and gangster films to psychedelic drugs and burgeoning countercultures.



In 1962, he made the only feature film about the civil rights movement to be made during the civil rights movement: The Intruder, starring William Shatner, which was shot on location in the Deep South.

Corman’s dedication to independent film production quickly set him apart from other producers and directors in the 1950s and 1960s. Having produced more than 550 films, Corman is known for working with incredibly small budgets and in short periods of time. The films he produced and directed in the 1950s for American International Pictures were highly successful, low-budget features—the kinds of films he has continued to make and support throughout his career.

With a famously sharp eye for talent, Corman is credited with having discovered some of the most remarkable actors and directors of the last five decades. He fostered the careers of Jack Nicholson, Francis Ford Coppola, Dennis Hopper, Peter Fonda, Robert De Niro, Jonathan Demme, Martin Scorsese, Ron Howard, and James Cameron, among many others.

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Corman was a sympathetic and accessible mentor, often giving those with little or no experience opportunities to direct or star in his films.
Corman’s sense for great cinema has reached far beyond his own productions. In the 1970s, he brought to American audiences foreign-language films that were ignored by major distributors.

New World Pictures, the company that Corman founded with his brother in 1970, distributed not only a slew of Corman’s own films, but also masterpieces by auteurs such as Ingmar Bergman, Federico Fellini, Akira Kurosawa, and François
Truffaut, as well as important works by less well-known foreign directors.

As director, producer, mentor, and distributor, Roger Corman has helped to define motion pictures. Join us in celebrating a true American independent as we honor Roger Corman for his exceptional career and tremendous contributions to cinema.

Ticket information available now.

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Eastman house restores lost Orson Welles film

Posted by on Aug 07 2013 | Motion Pictures

A very exciting day for Eastman House, National Film Preservation Foundation, the Cineteca del Friuli and Cinemazero.

A long lost film…found. It’s 35mm, it’s nitrate, it’s slapstick. Too Much Johnson.

Our very own Tony Delgrosso, Head of Preservation and Daniela Currò, Preservation Officer in the Motion Picture Department discuss their experience:

 

“Holding in one’s hands the very same print that had been personally edited by Orson Welles 75 years ago provokes an emotion that’s just impossible to describe.”
Paolo Cherchi Usai, Senior Curator of Film, George Eastman House

To find out more, and ticketing information for the U.S. premiere of Too Much Johnson, visit eastmanhouse.org/lostwellesfilm

 

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Male/Female Film Series

Posted by on Jul 29 2013 | Motion Pictures

 

iwasamalewarbride

(I was a Male War Bride, Howard Hawks, US 1949, 35mm)

 
In conjunction with the exhibition The Gender Show (on view through October 13), the Dryden presents films that explore concepts of masculinity and femininity, with an emphasis on works that challenge, rather than uphold, traditional ideas of gender.

The most recent film in the series, Alain Berliner’s Ma vie en rose, was a surprise art-house hit that explores a young boy’s homosexuality (and his parents’ difficulties accepting it) with charm, grace, and wit. Those last three terms can also be applied to I Was a Male War Bride, a classic Howard Hawks collaboration with Cary Grant that allows co-star Ann Sheridan to steadily break down Grant’s “manly” image to hilarious effect.

On the flipside, Sam Fuller’s Forty Guns gives Barbara Stanwyck full command of the titular group of cowboys in a wild scenario that makes Johnny Guitar look like a kiddie serial.

Finally, we’ll conclude with one of the most subversive cinematic looks at gender ever made: Edward D. Wood Jr.’s Glen or Glenda, a film in the form of a bargain-basement Z-movie that veers between unbelievable camp and deeply moving confession.

 

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