Archive for the 'History' Category

Eastman House celebrates 20 years of Dutch Connection

Posted by on Feb 21 2014 | Exhibitions, History, House & Gardens, Other

For the last 20 years, in February, George Eastman House has organized the Dutch Connection to show the kind of flowers George Eastman enjoyed in his home from late fall to early spring. Although there is no record of his bulb order for 1913/1914, historic records indicate that Mr. Eastman typically ordered varieties of each plant included in this exhibition—tulip, daffodil, hyacinth, and amaryllis bulbs; freesia corms; and clivia, begonia, campanula, hellebore, primrose, and azalea. Because this two-week exhibition includes the total number of plants that Mr. Eastman would order for display over a five-month period, you are enjoying approximately ten times the number of blooms that Mr. Eastman would have displayed at one time.

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In July, 2013, nearly 6,000 bulbs were ordered. The bulbs were shipped in late September and volunteers and staff potted the tulips, daffodils and hyacinth. These pots were then placed in a dark, cool root cellar in Highland Park. Tulips, daffodils and hyacinth require a 12 to 15 week 40 to 45 °F cool, dark period, much like they get when planted in the garden. The potted bulbs that were in the root cellar were moved into the greenhouse in January. In the greenhouse, the bulbs require 2 to 7 weeks, depending on variety, at 55 to 65 °F. with full sunlight to flower. The bulbs were forced into bloom at Lucas Greenhouses, Fairport, NY. The freesias and amaryllis were grown in the Palm House until they could be moved to the greenhouse in January. The azaleas, hellebores, clivia, primrose, campanula, and begonias are grown on site or purchased from a wholesaler.

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The exhibition opened on Valentine’s Day and will close on Sunday, March 2. At any one time there are over 3,000 blooms in the exhibition. The tulip, daffodil, and hyacinth blooms last only a week in the relatively warm, dry, Conservatory environment, and are replaced once during the exhibition. The azaleas, hellebores, freesias, amaryllis, clivia, begonias, campanula, and primrose bloom two weeks or longer.

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Our tribute to Ray Harryhausen

Posted by on May 10 2013 | History, Motion Pictures

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Ray Harryhausen at the Dryden Theatre in 2004

The great Ray Harryhausen died on Tuesday. The pioneering animator and special effects artist visited us at the Dryden Theatre nine years ago this month to receive the George Eastman Honorary Scholar award. The house was sold out for this very special event. Harryhausen was a major influence on virtually every science fiction and fantasy filmmaker of the last 60 years. It was his imagination that created some of the most memorable and beloved creatures in the history of cinema.

Beginning with THE 7TH VOYAGE OF SINBAD he conceived ideas, drew conceptual artwork, supervised all animation sequences and served as co-producer of all his films. As John Landis pointed out in a Dryden interview only one week earlier, this fact makes Harryhausen that rare non-director to earn the designation of an auteur. It’s the realization of Harryhausen’s vision that you’re witnessing when you watch CLASH OF THE TITANS or JASON AND THE ARGONAUTS. Those are his films.

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Ray Harryhausen at the Dryden Theatre in 2004

Harryhausen was generous when he visited the Dryden. He signed autographs, posed for pictures and answered questions. His sense of humor put the audience at ease when he said
“Some people call me a geek. I don’t know what that means, but I guess it’s a compliment.”
 

He said that he will always be grateful to Kodak. When he got out of the Army he took with him 1000 feet of outdated Kodachrome stock that was going to be thrown out. He decided to try shooting some fairy tales and the color “still looks beautiful after all these years.”

It was the beginning of a legendary career in the movies.

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George Eastman Honored By Thousands

Posted by on Mar 14 2013 | History, House & Gardens, Other

Today we honor the memory and legacy of George Eastman. March 14, 1932george_eastman_1932

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Film Matters: Ain’t Nothin Like The Real Thing

Posted by on Aug 30 2012 | Exploring the Archive, History, Motion Pictures

The Dryden Theatre is a staple to film culture and motion picture history. The venue contains decades of memories among the walls, floors, and folding seats. The stories within the deep, curious cinema are many. The modest piano sits stage right, finely tuned and ready to go.  The hushed voices, watchful eyes, ears and smiles surround the box office just before a film begins.

So let’s talk 35mm – let’s talk depth of field, luminosity, purity and beauty. The Dryden screens 35mm almost exclusively (well, every once in a while we mix it up).  You won’t find DVD or Blue-ray here- only film–and oftentimes original. The George Eastman House collection is vast, as are our connections to fellow archives and studios, allowing the Dryden’s film series to be strategically crafted with thoughtful themes and chock-full with the best actors, directors and producers throughout history.

The next frontier for the Dryden is making members and the public aware of the magic of the theater. It is reminding patrons of the unique experience of watching a movie on the big screen shot on 35 or screening silent films with musical accompaniment. It is about the conversations before and after, and the community of this place. I’m proud to present to you a look at the Dryden Theatre and its importance locally and internationally. 
Meet Lori and Kolbe…

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Retina Camera Research

Posted by on Aug 13 2012 | Exploring the Archive, History, Photography

Some interesting research happening at Eastman House – David Jentz of the Retina Historical Society is here, along with co-researcher, Dr. Klaus-Peter Roesner of Germany looking at our Retina cameras, accessories, and literature in the collection. Mr. Jentz is a well known authority on the Retina camera and has lectured and published numerous articles.

Here are some examples of the cameras they’re spending time with.

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