Daguerreotyping at Eastman House

Posted by on Mar 03 2011 | Behind The Scenes, History, Other, Photography


I’m just now packing up my head stand and posing table to take home after the daguerreotype workshop last week. We had a great group here with people from all over as usual. Mike Robinson and I haven’t taught together for years, but it was like the old days back in the mid-1990s when Mike, France and I taught the first process workshops here at the museum with Roger Watson. The images made during last week’s workshop were extraordinary. Todd Gustavson showed the group gems of the technology collection including American and European daguerreotype equipment and Joe Struble laid out an exhibit of rare daguerreotypes I had chosen the week before. The whole experience was as magical as the process.

Daguerreotype of me posing for Mike Robinson.

 

Workshop attendee David Vogt sitting for the camera.

 

 David’s Daguerreotype.

 

Joe Struble and attendee Paul d’Orleans amazed by the results.

Mike and I will cross alternative process paths again this summer in July. France and I will be teaching the Dawn of Photography workshop [photogenic drawings], followed by a workshop on the Wet & Dry Collodion processes at Fox Talbot Museum at Lacock Abbey, Wiltshire, England. The reunion will be complete because Roger Watson is now the curator of Fox Talbot Museum. As we’re packing up from the collodion workshop Mike will be prepping for a Daguerreotype workshop he’ll be teaching the next week.

As for me, it’s on to carbon printing next…!

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    Mark Osterman is the Process Historian in the Kay R. Whitmore Conservation Center at George Eastman House. Best known for his depth of knowledge in the area of collodion photography, Osterman is also internationally recognized for his research and teaching of photographic processes from Niepce heliographs to gelatin emulsions. Osterman's curriculum, once reserved for the international conservation community, is now available to the public through a series of hands-on workshops at Eastman House and other venues in the U.S. and abroad.

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