George Eastman House Extends Archive into Outer Space

Posted by on Mar 31 2010 | Other

After decades of research by museums and archives, it has been determined by scientific study that the optimum storage conditions for rare artifacts are in outer space.

As a result, George Eastman House announced today it will be the first museum in the world to store a portion of its extensive archives — which totals 4 million artifacts related to photography and motion pictures — in outer space, via a module on the International Space Station.

To reflect the “out of this world” vision, the museum has officially changed its name to George Eastman House Intergalactic Museum of Photography and Film.

“Our global reach is being vastly extended,” said Dr. Anthony Bannon, the museum’s Ron and Donna Fielding Director, who has been training with the space program at Cape Canaveral for the last four months. Bannon will accompany the first collection launched into space.

 

The Right Stuff: Official space-program training portrait of Eastman House’s Dr. Anthony Bannon.

Jeff Hayzlett, Kodak’s chief marketing officer, is joining Bannon on the space journey. He also has begun training at Cape Canaveral, under the guidance of appointed astronauts Majors Tony Nelson and Roger Healy.

Kodak has been involved with space missions since the beginning of the space program.

“Kodak is happy to put our full might of our intellectual imaging science prowess behind this endeavor to ensure image permanence,” Hayzlett said.

 

Official space-program training portrait of Kodak’s Jeff Hayzlett.

Staff of the Intergalactic Museum have chosen several Oscar®-winning science fiction films to be among the first collections stored in space.

“George Eastman House, now the Intergalactic Museum, has long been at the forefront of photograph conservation and film preservation, and this museum and its expert staff continue to break new ground in all frontiers,” said Kaplan Jameskirk, chief operations officer of the Enterprise Museum Association.

The scientific studies, conducted over the past eight years at the Jabbahut Institute in conjunction with Eastman House, revealed that zero gravity aligned with the ideal climate conditions of outer space will preserve museum artifacts for thousands of years, possibly light years, beyond what archivists previously thought possible.

As the Intergalactic Museum prepares to go where no man has gone before, we wish you a Happy April Fool’s Day from George Eastman House International Museum of Photography and Film … where we will continue to proudly preserve the world’s treasures of photography and motion pictures, here on the ground.

But rest assured, if our research at Eastman House were to show space offers the optimum conditions for archival storage, we’d be at the forefront of such an initiative.

May the force be with you.

 

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    Dresden Engle is the Public Relations Manager for George Eastman House International Museum of Photography and Film.

    4 comments for now

    4 Responses to “George Eastman House Extends Archive into Outer Space”

    1. Jeannie

      Way to go Eastman House….. you are “far out” with this!! Happy April Fools! I laughed so hard I had tears in my eyes! Very fun post!!

      01 Apr 2010 at 9:25 am

    2. Mary Wilkins

      So, Dr. Bannon, is this intergalactic mission the reason we haven’t seen you lately on Sunday?

      01 Apr 2010 at 9:45 am

    3. [...] George Eastman House Extends Archive into Outer Space George Eastman House announced today it will be the first museum in the world to store a portion of its extensive archives — which totals 4 million artifacts related to photography and motion pictures — in outer space, via a module on the International Space Station. [...]

      01 Apr 2010 at 3:28 pm

    4. Darren

      The transporting of material between the two sites will cost a fortune!! Is the Space Shuttle liceneced to transport Nitrate?………Love the article!

      02 Apr 2010 at 2:18 am