REBECCA Trivia

Posted by on Nov 06 2014 | contest, Motion Pictures

This Saturday, November 8 at 8 p.m., the Dryden Theatre will present a rare, nitrate screening of Alfred Hitchcock’s Rebecca (US 1940, 130 min., 35mm).

The first—and best—film adaptation of Daphne du Maurier’s classic mystery story was also Alfred Hitchcock’s American directorial debut. Filled with sunlight and shadow, fueled by elegant, pitch-perfect performances from Laurence Olivier, Joan Fontaine, George Sanders, and Judith Anderson, this version of Rebecca remains unequaled in its moody rendition of how the past can overtake and destroy the present.

We’re celebrating this special screening by giving away our Rebecca poster from the Dryden Theatre lobby. But we’re going to make you earn it! The first person to comment below the correct answer to the following trivia question receives this classic poster plus two tickets to the Dryden Theatre to a film of your choice!

rebecca-poster

Good luck and see you at the Dryden!

QUESTION: The final scene of Rebecca was filmed with a variable area soundtrack as opposed to the variable density soundtrack of the rest of the film. Why did Hitchcock choose to shoot just this scene in this way?

Please enter your answer in the comment section below.

 

Kolbe Resnick is the Theater Manager of the Dryden Theatre.

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Kodak Camera at 125: Eastman’s First Film Patent

Posted by on Oct 14 2014 | Exhibitions, George Eastman, Other, Technology

On October 14, 1884, George Eastman received his first “film” patent (#306,594) for Negative Paper. While this was a paper film (not very related to the transparent product most people think of today) and not very successful, it eventually lead to improved versions incorporated into the first Kodak camera introduced in 1888 – a milestone in the history of photography.

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Over the years, Eastman acquired many patents related to both film manufacturing and film and the apparatus to use them including #317,050 dated May 5, 1885 for the Eastman Walker roll holder and more importantly #388,850 patented Sept 5, 1888 for the Kodak.

1888-Kodak-camera-ad

Our current exhibition Kodak Camera at 125 showcases the new system of photography that Eastman introduced to the world with the Kodak camera in 1888 and the innovative parts used to build the device. We encourage you to visit to see objects from our collection that show the evolution of his cameras and the snapshots each has captured.

Todd Gustavson is the curator of technology at George Eastman House, working with the collection for more than 20 years.

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George Eastman and Bicycles

Posted by on Oct 06 2014 | Exploring the Archive, George Eastman, History

Far be it from me to compare myself to George Eastman, but there’s at least one thing we have in common: We both had stages of our lives in which we were enthusiastic about bicycling.

My enthusiasm started last year with the coinciding of ROC Transit Day and the breaking down of my car. I figured it was worth a shot bicycling the mile and a half to and from Eastman House. I saved up for a decent bike and gave it a try. I haven’t regretted it since. In addition to the 10 minute ride to work, I use my bike to meet up with friends, grocery shop, and get to Red Wings games.

Several employees and students at Eastman House commute regularly on their bikes. The racks are full on nice days.

Several employees and students at Eastman House commute regularly on their bikes. The racks are full on nice days.

Here are some neat facts about George Eastman and bicycles:

George Eastman bicycled to work – not just in his young banking days but even when Kodak was well-established. In her biography of Eastman, Betsy Brayer notes that “up until the turn of the century, Eastman rode a bicycle to work in good weather and parked it in the basement of the Kodak Office at 343 State Street.” The ride from Soule House (the residence he and his mother lived in before he built his mansion) to Kodak State Street was a 2.6 mile ride each way.

Eastman and his bicycle ca. 1910.

Eastman and his bicycle ca. 1910.

Eastman and some companions cycled throughout Europe several times in the 1890s. In addition to having fun with friends, Eastman used the trips to explore locations for potential Kodak branches.

Eastman also bicycled through the Berkshires of Massachusetts. Eastman had an endurance I haven’t built up to yet. A close friend of Eastman’s wrote him in July 1892 saying, “You must be having a very elegant time on your bicycle trip. You must be getting as strong as an ox, if you are making fifty-seven or eight miles in a day.”

On one of his transatlantic trips, Eastman met Albert H. Overman, creator of the Overman Wheel Company and Victor Bicycles. The two struck up a friendship that lasted over three decades. Eastman enthusiastically rode Victor Bicycles and bought them for friends and family. Eastman and Overman went in together on a hunting property in North Carolina called Oak Lodge. Eastman eventually purchased Overman’s share and vacationed there multiple times a year for the rest of his life.

Eastman’s horse carriage struck two cyclists in 1899: “a small boy” on Park Avenue and an older gentleman on State Street. Eastman was quick to point out in correspondence that neither accident was his fault – they had swerved into his carriage. Eastman paid for the young boy’s bicycle wheel to be repaired.

Kodak focused a great amount of advertising toward cyclists in the early days. Kodak had a line of Bicycle Kodaks. Just as cyclists today purchase mounts for their smart phones, cyclists back in the 1890s purchased cases to attach their cameras to their bikes. Many ads featured a bicycling man with the slogan “Take a Kodak with you.” Kodak encouraged photo-taking by cyclists by promoting the adventures of Thomas G. Allen Jr. and William L. Sachtleben, two American college graduates who set out to travel the world on their bicycles. Their narratives and Kodak photos were featured in The Century and later as the book Across Asia on a Bicycle.

Kodak ad from the 1890s

Kodak ad from the 1890s

Kodak ad from the 1890s

Kodak ad from the 1890s

Eastman remarked to a friend in 1895: “They are getting bicycles down in this country to marvelously low weights. Crouch has just bought one…that only weighs 17 lbs. You can take it up in one hand and swing it over your head…Such a reduction of weight must add very materially to the pleasure of touring.” Eastman would get a kick out of the plethora of folding bikes that are now on the market.
The Legacy Collection at Eastman House has three bicycle plates from George Eastman’s bicycles. Two are manufacturer’s plates (Iver Johnson’s Arms & Cycle Works of Fitchburg, MA and Pierce Cycle Co. of Angola, NY). The third is a personalized name plate the he had made.

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Jesse Peers is the archivist of the George Eastman Legacy Collection.

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Walking the Camino at the Dryden

Posted by on Sep 25 2014 | Motion Pictures, Other

“Around 1 p.m. we were overcome with the paranoid notion that we were waiting for a train that would never come. We threw on our packs and headed out into the wasteland of abandoned buildings to find answers.” [Train station El Burgo Ranero headed toward Leon, September 24, 2013]

This is a journal entry by Jeff Stanin, George Eastman House staff member. Exactly one year ago, Jeff was in the midst of a 500-mile pilgrimage across Spain known as the Camino de Santiago. This Saturday, September 27, at 8 p.m., the Dryden Theatre will be screening the Rochester Premiere of Walking the Camino: Six Ways to Santiago. The documentary follows six strangers from diverse walks of life walking this same journey, each with a unique story to tell.

Post-screening, Jeff will lead a discussion based on his unique journey across the Camino de Santiago. We hope you’ll join us!

For more information on the screening visit dryden.eastmanhouse.org

Jeff and wife Elizabeth at the Statue of the Wind-Battered Pilgrim

Jeff and wife Elizabeth at the Statue of the Wind-Battered Pilgrim

Sign marker of the Camino

Sign marker of the Camino

Church outside of Villalcazar de Sirga

Church outside of Villalcazar de Sirga

Setting out into the hot, dusty plains known as the Meseta

Setting out into the hot, dusty plains known as the Meseta

 

Rachel Pikus is the Manager of Online Engagement at George Eastman House International Museum of Photography and Film.

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The Dawn of Technicolor

Posted by on Sep 18 2014 | Motion Pictures

Next year will be the 100th anniversary of the Technicolor Motion Picture Corporation, whose revolutionary color processes transformed cinema from black & white into a brilliant rainbow of color. As caretakers of the Technicolor Corporate Archive, George Eastman House is planning a series of events and collaborations to celebrate Technicolor’s enduring legacy. Particular focus will be given to the company’s formative years, which have remained largely in the shadow of its later success.

Two-color Technicolor camera. George Eastman House. Gift of Technicolor.

Two-color Technicolor camera. George Eastman House. Gift of Technicolor.

These events will kick-off at this year’s Le Giornate del Cinema Muto (commonly known as the Pordenone Silent Film Festival), which runs from October 4-11, 2014. This specialist film festival takes place in the city of Pordenone in northern Italy, and attracts hundreds of film historians, archivists, academics, and silent film enthusiasts from all over the world. This year, film historian David Pierce and I will be presenting the series The Dawn of Technicolor, which includes a host of silent features, shorts and excerpts made using the two-color Technicolor process.

Inside the Teatro Verdi at the Pordenone Silent Film Festival

Inside the Teatro Verdi at the Pordenone Silent Film Festival

In total, there will be six “programs” of films over the week-long festival; four dedicated exclusively to Technicolor productions, and two consisting of shorts made using other color processes, such as Prizma Color, Handschiegl spot coloring, and Multicolor. These two contextual programs have been curated in collaboration with the “Colour in the 1920s” research project overseen by Prof. Sarah Street of Bristol University and Dr. Joshua Yumibe of the University of St. Andrews. Highlights of the series will include rarely-seen shorts and tests preserved by Eastman House; the earliest surviving Technicolor feature, The Toll of the Sea (1922); Ben-Hur: A Tale of the Christ (1925), which includes nine Technicolor inserts; the British Film Institute’s superior restoration of Douglas Fairbanks’s swashbuckler The Black Pirate (1926); and the recently “rediscovered” color print of The Mysterious Island (1929) from the Czech Národní filmový archiv.

The short film Manchu Love (Elmer Clifton, US 1929) has been preserved by George Eastman House and will screen in the Dawn of Technicolor series at the Pordenone Silent Film Festival. Frame enlargement from 35mm nitrate Technicolor dye-transfer print. George Eastman House. Gift of Alan D. Kattelle.

The short film Manchu Love (Elmer Clifton, US 1929) has been preserved by George Eastman House and will screen in the Dawn of Technicolor series at the Pordenone Silent Film Festival. Frame enlargement from 35mm nitrate Technicolor dye-transfer print. George Eastman House. Gift of Alan D. Kattelle.

Following the Giornate, David Pierce and I will present the Ernest Lindgren Memorial Lecture at the BFI London Film Festival on October 15. This 90-minute archival talk will illustrate Technicolor’s origins during the silent era using photographs and documents from the Technicolor Corporate Archive and excerpts from rarely-seen Technicolor films of the 1920s.

Both these events precede the launch of Eastman House’s new publication, The Dawn of Technicolor, 1915-1935, written by myself and David Pierce. This fully-researched and beautifully-produced book will be released in the new year and will include more than 400 black & white and color illustrations throughout. Furthermore, in January 2015, Eastman House will host the exhibition In Glorious Technicolor and a major three-month film series in the Dryden Theatre. We will be sharing more news of all of these exciting activities over the coming months.

Actor Richard Dix and cameraman Edward Estabrook inspect a two-color Technicolor camera during the production of Redskin (Victor Schertzinger, US 1929). George Eastman House. Gift of Connie Estabrook.

Actor Richard Dix and cameraman Edward Estabrook inspect a two-color Technicolor camera during the production of Redskin (Victor Schertzinger, US 1929). George Eastman House. Gift of Connie Estabrook.

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James Layton is a Research and Information Specialist in Eastman House's Moving Image Department. He is also the co-author of the publication The Dawn of Technicolor, 1915-1935.

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